Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Hello World! Happy 2020th Palm Sunday (April 5th) and Easter, Sunday (April 12th) and "chag Pesach sameach" Happy Passover #PalmSunday #Easter #Passover

Hello World! Happy 2020th Palm Sunday (April 5th)  and Easter, Sunday (April 12th) and "chag Pesach sameach" Happy Passover  will begin at sunset on Wednesday, April 8th and ends an nightfall on Thursday, April 16th. #PalmSunday #Easter #Passover

This is a repost of earlier annual Easter/Palm Sunday and Passover posts with minor edits. Enjoy!

Hello World! Happy 2020th Palm Sunday  and Easter, Sunday and "chag Pesach sameach" Happy Passover.  May your days today and always be filled with love, happiness and blessings.


“Do not abandon yourselves to despair. We are the Easter people and hallelujah is our song." 
 ~~ Pope John Paul II 
sometimes called Blessed John Paul or John Paul the Great, born Karol Józef Wojtyła (Polish: [ˈkarɔl ˈjuzɛf vɔjˈtɨwa]; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005), was Pope from 16 October 1978 to his death in 2005. He was the second longest-serving pope in history and, as a Pole, the first non-Italian since Pope Adrian VI, who died in 1523.


Hello World! Happy 2020th Easter America. Happy Name Day and Palm Sunday Mom.

Palm Sunday has always been a very special day for our family.

My late mom was born on Palm Sunday (March 28, 1926), which is why my grandmother named her "Palma."

 Happy Palm Sunday, happy name day and may you be dancing up in the clouds, celebrating how much you are loved and missed. 

You haven't really left us, you have just moved to a peaceful place and you are always in our thoughts and prayers.


Wonderful keepsake photo of my late mom with her mother, Grandma Elvira. 



They resembled each other so much.

They were so beautiful and similar in many ways - great cooking, baking, entertaining, etc. 


Everyone was welcome in their homes.



Another great photo of my late mom with John Tesh  #ITFYL #JohnTest  . Mom was so fond of this photo. Her smile radiates everywhere regardless of her age. In this photo she was in her late 70s. Amazing!
Photo collage of my late mom (TOP L-R, with her youngest grandchildren, Mariel & Anthony; granddaughter Mariel's lovely "get-well card; mom upstate New York holding me as an infant). (BOTTOM L-R, me & mom celebrating another bon-voyage cruise; mom in either CA or OK at a wedding; mom with her mom, Grandma Elvira.

Mom as the most beautiful bride with her handsome groom, my wonderful Dad, during their wedding day, September 5, 1948.









Sharing mom's Eulogy here to remember her life, her amazing gifts, talents, smiles  and her love. (see image to the right)

Also another way to celebrate her name day, Palm Sunday. 


Our brother presented the Eulogy at the Funeral Mass on February 28, 2012.


I strongly believe our mom is at peace knowing her children are well.


Palm Sunday always brings me fond memories with family and friends. 



On Palm Sunday 2015, I had quite a few chuckles. Much to my surprise, two wild turkeys strutted in my back yard and left quite an impression! 

Gobbling, trotting and pecking around, I had to take a video with my iPhone. Glad I did as there is never a sure-shot they will show up again in my back yard.

Enjoy the Wild Turkeys videos. Below are Take 1 and Take 2 videos.


Second video Wild Turkeys Take 2 
or visit these links for Wild Turkeys Take 1 and https://youtu.be/ev8dcSwQtE8

About Easter

Easter (Old English Ēostre; Latin: Pascha; Greek Πάσχα Paskha, the latter two derived from Hebrew: פֶּסַח‎ Pesaḥ) is a Christian festival and holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ on the third day after his crucifixion at Calvary as described in the New Testament.

Easter is the culmination of the Passion of Christ, preceded by Lent, a forty-day period of fasting, prayer, and penance.

Easter is for everyone, for adults it brings back memories of childhood days filled with beautiful spring flowers and fabulous Sunday celebrations.
Easter, like Christmas, is for children. Celebrating Easter with children is truly special – from colored Easter Eggs, Chocolate Easter Bunnies to Easter Egg hunts and parades and bonnets make this day extra magical.

Easter is a moveable feast, meaning it is not fixed in relation to the civil calendar. The First Council of Nicaea (325) established the date of Easter as the first Sunday after the full moon (the Paschal Full Moon) following the March equinox.

Ecclesiastically, the equinox is reckoned to be on 21 March (although the astronomical equinox occurs on 20 March in most years), and the "Full Moon" is not necessarily on the astronomically correct date. The date of Easter therefore varies from 22 March to 25 April inclusive. Eastern

The precise date of Easter has at times been a matter for contention. By the later 2nd century, it was accepted that the celebration of the holiday was a practice of the disciples and an undisputed tradition.

Easter is linked to the Jewish Passover by much of its symbolism, as well as by its position in the calendar. In many languages, the words for "Easter" and "Passover" are identical or very similar.

Easter customs vary across the Christian world, and include sunrise services, exclaiming the Paschal greeting, clipping the church[12] and decorating Easter eggs, a symbol of the empty tomb.

Additional customs that have become associated with Easter and are observed by both Christians and some non-Christians include egg hunting, the Easter Bunny, and Easter parades.

The Easter parade is an American cultural event consisting of a festive strolling procession on Easter Sunday. The parade is somewhat of an informal and unorganized event, with or without religious significance. Persons participating in an Easter parade traditionally dress in new and fashionable clothing, particularly ladies' hats, and strive to impress others with their finery.
The Easter parade is most closely associated with Fifth Avenue in New York City, but Easter parades are held in many other cities. Starting as a spontaneous event in the 1870s, the New York parade became increasingly popular into the mid-20th century—in 1947, it was estimated to draw over a million people. Its popularity has declined significantly, drawing only 30,000 in 2008.

Many Americans follow the tradition of coloring hard-boiled eggs and giving baskets of candy. The Easter Bunny is a popular legendary anthropomorphic Easter gift-giving character analogous to Santa Claus in American culture.


On Easter Monday, the President of the United States holds an annual Easter egg roll on the White House lawn for young children. New York City holds an annual Easter parade on Easter Sunday.
Easter eggs, also called Paschal eggs, are special eggs that are often given to celebrate Easter or springtime. As such, Easter eggs are common during the season of Eastertide. The oldest tradition is to use dyed and painted chicken eggs, but a modern custom is to substitute chocolate eggs, or plastic eggs filled with confectionery such as jelly beans.
Eggs, in general, were a traditional symbol of fertility, and rebirth. In Christianity, for the celebration of Eastertide, Easter eggs symbolize the empty tomb of Jesus: though an egg appears to be like the stone of a tomb, a bird hatches from it with life; similarly, the Easter egg, for Christians, is a reminder that Jesus rose from the grave, and that those who believe will also experience eternal life.

The precise origin of the ancient custom of decorating eggs is not known, although evidently the blooming of many flowers in spring coincides with the use of the fertility symbol of eggs—and eggs boiled with some flowers change their color, bringing the spring into the homes.
Many Christians of the Eastern Orthodox Church to this day typically dye their Easter eggs red, the color of blood, in recognition of the blood of the sacrificed Christ (and, of the renewal of life in springtime). Some also use the color green, in honor of the new foliage emerging after the long dead time of winter.

The Easter Bunny (also called the Easter Rabbit or Easter Hare) is a fantasy character depicted as a rabbit bringing Easter eggs.

Originating among German Lutherans, the Easter Hare originally played the role of a judge, evaluating whether children were good or disobedient in behaviour at the start of the season of Eastertide.

The Easter Bunny is sometimes depicted with clothes. In legend, the creature carries colored eggs in his basket, candy and sometimes also toys to the homes of children, and as such shows similarities to Santa Claus, as they both bring gifts to children on the night before their respective holiday. The custom was first mentioned in Georg Franck von Franckenau's De ovis paschalibus[2] (About Easter Eggs) in 1682[3] referring to a German tradition of an Easter Hare bringing Easter Eggs for the children. In many church services on Easter Sunday, a live rabbit representing the Easter Bunny, is brought into the congregation, especially for the children's message.

An Easter Bonnet represents the tail-end of a tradition of wearing new clothes at Easter, in harmony with the renewal of the year and the promise of spiritual renewal and redemption.

The "Easter bonnet" was fixed in popular culture by Irving Berlin, whose frame of reference was the Easter parade in New York City, a festive walkabout that made its way down Fifth Avenue from St. Patrick's Cathedral:



"In your Easter bonnet
with all the frills upon it,
You'll be the grandest lady in the Easter parade."
by Irving Berlin

At the depths of the Great Depression a new hat at Easter, or a refurbished old one, was a simple luxury. 

Will you be celebrating Easter? Showing off your Easter bonnet or attending an Easter Day Parade?

















RESOURCES: 
 ♦ The 29th Annual Easter Bonnet Competion by the Theatre Development Fund, takes place on April 20th and April 21st at Minskoff Theatre, more info at https://www.tdf.org/shows/9214/The-29th-Annual-Easter-Bonnet-Competition (last year The 28th Annual Easter Bonnet Competition (2014) by Broadway Cares http://broadwaycares.org/easterbonnet2014)
♦ Easter Day Parade http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_parade
♦ Easter Sunday on Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_Sunday
♦ Easter 2015 from Calendar 365 http://www.calendar-365.com/holidays/easter.html‎
♦ Easter Egg Hunts http://www.easteregghuntsandevents.org/
♦ Easter Parade and Easter Bonnet Festival in New York City http://gonyc.about.com/cs/holidays/a/easter.htm


♦ Ann Miller' sings and taps to "Shakin' the Blues Away" from Easter Parade (1948) she was an amazing tap dancer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yS1e9zksJ8
♦ Easter Parade – Fred Astaire and Judy Garland on YouTube 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKt54TFrxMc
This post is an updated repost from previous annual Easter posts. Please visit this blog frequently and share this with your social media. Follow me @gbdaly Thanks.

Thursday, March 12, 2020

wowOwow ...WWW is 031 Today ... March 12, 2020

This is a reporting of earlier ones with minor edits. Enjoy!

wowOwow ... WWW is 031 Today ... March 12, 2020



Happy 31st World Wide Web !


"Let the web serve humanity"

Tim Berners-Lee, SirTimothy John Berners-Lee (born 8 June 1955), also known as TimBL, is an English engineer and computer scientist, best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web. He is currently a professor of computer science at the University of Oxford and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).  @timberners_lee    https://twitter.com/timberners_lee


WWW Inventor, Tim Berners-Lee celebrates on Twitter

Hard to believe WWW is 31 years, it's done so much and transformed itself so many times one would think it's at least 100.


Oh boy, do I wish it did really serve humanity well. Unfortunately, there's just too much propaganda, bias, control, and greed at the expense of  human rights and democracy. When will this end?


Perhaps it's good intentioned inventor, Tim Berners-Lee can invent an antidote application to counteract this horriffic poison to humanity. If anyone can, I know he can and not just by speaking and advocating but by building something better intended for humanity.

In any event, WWW probably the greatest disruption of the 19th century.

Resources:

  • Latest from Tim Berners-Lee on WWW's 30th: https://webfoundation.org/2019/03/web-birthday-30/
  • https://indianexpress.com/article/technology/tech-news-technology/the-world-wide-web-turns-30-web-inventor-sir-tim-berners-lee-on-the-fight-for-a-better-web-5621800/
  • Sir Tim Berners-Lee on why tech companies cannot forgo human rights for profits,The Indian EXPRESS:  https://webfoundation.org/2019/03/web-birthday-30/
  • The Man Who Invented the WWW Has Mixed Feelings About What The Internet Has Become, Time, http://time.com/5549551/tim-berners-lee-inventor-internet/
  • World Wide Web Consortium, W3C, http://www.w3.org/ - Info on Tim Berners-Lee https://www.w3.org/People/Berners-Lee/#Press
  • Google celebrates with all tech doodle video show


Sunday, March 8, 2020

Happy 111th International Women's Day World! This year the theme ~ "An equal world is an enabled world " Tweet #EachforEqual; #IWD2020 throughout your social media. What's your action for equality? Here's mine.

This blog posting is an updated/revised version of articles posted in prior years. Every year I include my action for the current IWD theme.  Have you done this yet? You should.  Enjoy!

The earliest Women's Day observance, called "National Woman's Day,"[8] was held on February 28, 1909, in New York City.

“An equal world is an enabled world"


This year, the IWD2020 theme hashtag is #EachforEqual 

What are your plans for celebrating women?  Mine is celebrating womens' achievements, gender equality, leadership especially continuing to set examples of advocating awareness against bias, bullying and taking action for equality.  

Besides incorporating my social media with hashtags, #EachforEqual; #IWD2020  my action for #IWD2020  #EachforEqual is celebrating womens' achievements, gender equality, and especially leadership in everything I do, setting example, always being kind and respectful, advocating awareness against bias, bullying and ultimately taking action for equality. ~Gloria Buono-Daly  #ThoughtOfTheDay #QuoteOfTheDay 

I think of so many things everyone can do such as showing respect, kindness - be it with family, workplace, etc. Promoting integrity and leadership - by being honest, standing up for what is right, reporting harassment and abuse especially in the workplace, etc.

I also share my thoughts Twitter; This helps me put things into perspective, sort of journal my thoughts but in a different way than journaling. How do you take action for #EachforEqual  #IWD2020?

Below are excerpts from prior annual #IWD blog postings.

International Women's Day has been a focal point for global womens' rights since 1909.

Last year the theme was #BalanceForBetter #IWD2019 and prior to that #PressForProgress #IWD2018.  

We are about 190 years away from gender parity. The past several years have been a whirlwind of advocacy and progress for women advocating for reporting sexual abuse, harassment, bullying, regardless of how famous or powerful the attacker is.

Misconduct and harassment are serious issues that come in many different sizes and shapes. It's not just just about sexual harassment by men but by women as well.  


#IWD continues their global message with annual commemorations.  (photo right, lists commemorations of the past decade, 2010-2020)  

I find #IWDthemes inspiring and consistently evolve/expand on from prior years.  

The year 2017 marked awareness, advocacy for movements, momentum, progress.

#IWD2018  theme of the year is for all to #PressForProgress, #IWD2019 theme #BalanceforBetter. 

For earlier historical perspective on their commemorations, including UN commemorations from 1996 to present, visit International Women's Day on Wikipedia.or

Finally progress is momentous and significant. Women are becoming stronger all thanks to embracing and supporting each other. Sisterhood, brotherhood, are alive and well. 

Gone are the days of women being punished for reporting bad behavior, subterfuge, misconduct or harassment. However we still need to press for  progress more and continue moving forward.  

#MeToo and #TimesUp  movements came about after various harassment and misconduct accusations by the top entertainment and media icons including Harvey Weinstein, Matt Lauer, Kevin Spacey, Russell Simmons, Dustin Hoffman, James Toback, Tavis Smiley, as well as liberal Democrat politician Al Franken ...  The list of attackers of men by women, men by men and also women by women, appears to never end. -  #HarveyWeinstein, #KevinSpacey, #RussellSimons, #DustinHoffman, #JamesToback, #MattLauer, #TavisSmiley, #AlFranken ... Many victims, thus far over 200 from Harvey Weinstein alone and how can we forget about disgraced Bill Cosby - many women came forward yet many more remained silent. ? 

But what about the female or male co-worker at an organization who has been working hard, complying with the company standards of behavior and code of conduct only to be constantly bullied, abused and harassed by a female/male co-worker who feels threatened by his/her business ethics and/orskill set?  

What's your #PressForProgress? My action  is to continually speak up when something is wrong,  and be supportive to other women who are being harmed and/or harassed. I want to keep on "pressing" to be the best I can be in everything I do, to exercise leadership actions in my life (i.e., personal, at work, communications including my blog posts, etc.) and to always respect and celebrate differences for the good of all people and of course for our goal of increasing Gender Parity even though we are 200 years away. Also press progress by encouraging others to #PRESSFORPROGRESS



Equally important is for women at work. If a new employee at an organization however small or however large, is being harassed by another women who believes she is above the company policy and standards of behavior/code of conduct because of her 30 or so years of tenure, and constantly harms/harasses, belittles, you or others, etc.,  report it! Regardless of the consequences. Victims have rights and must be protected from employees who behave like goons and street gangsters inside the profit or non-profit organization.

WHAT'S YOUR ACTION FOR IWD2018?  #WhatsYourAction    Please share your #PRESSFORPROGRESS at this link   #IWD2018 

One of my favorite quotes by women:  

“If particular care and attention is not paid to the ladies, we are determined to forment a rebellion and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation.”    ~~ Abigail Adams,  U.S. First Lady, 1776 (née Smith; November 22 [O.S. November 11] 1744 – October 28, 1818) was the wife of John Adams, the first Vice President, and second President, of the United States, and the mother of John Quincy Adams, the sixth President.


Did you know that March 8, 2018 marks the 107th anniversary of International Women's Day?  Well now you do!  :) 

As soon as Google doodle is posted, if it's IWD2018 related, I will update here.

Google's #IWD2017 doodle to commemorate International Women's Day 2017 conveys the many bold actions by our leading women of the world. 

With  the #IWD2018 theme, PressForProgress #PressForProgress, Google's doodle for this year is charming and filled with various themes and #HerStory about various professional women all over the world! 

This post will be a good bookmark as it will add all doodle images dedicated to International Women's Day event, March 8th. We have them listed as far back as 2011 which marked IWDs 100th anniversary (scroll below if interested in viewing commemorative 100th IWD doodle).


Below please find the doodle from #IWD2017. The theme was "Be Bold For Action." The doodle depicted a collage of various women all over the world who soared leaps and bounds in medicine, sports, academia, aviation, and sciences to adventure, arts, entertainment, activism, and technology. 

A collage of 8 photos in the #IWD2017 Google Doodle below commemorate #IWD2017:

Opening image of Google's doodle for #IWD2017 which celebrated 13 inspirational women









Google has celebrated 2016 International Women's Day IWD2016 with a lovely "gender-parity" global themed doodle #OneDayIWill.
The video shows women all around the world sharing their goals and aspirations with words in their native language beginning with "One Day I Will ..."

From becoming scientists to speaking to Pope Francis, their actions and words are inspirational.




In 2015, Google celebrated with the inspiring and engaging doodle below for IWD2015:








Google posted a very charming doodle to celebrate IWD's 103rd  IWD2014 ).








IWD2013's 102nd doogle







IWD2012's 101st doogle

IWD2011s 100th IWD anniversary marked the very first IWD Google doodle celebration!









Below are sections taken from the 2017 IWD2017 blog post.

Happy 106th Anniversary to 

International Women's Day (IWD), originally coined International Working Women’s Day, is marked on March 8th every year.

The UN theme for International Women’s Day 2016 is "Pledge for Parity." #PledgeforParity.

Worldwide, women continue to contribute to social, economic, cultural and political achievement.

The theme in 2016 was
118 Years to Gender Parity?    In 2014, The World Economic Forum predicted it would take until 2095 to achieve global gender parity. Unfortunately, one year later, 2015, they estimated an even slower progress and the gender gap wouldn't close entirely until nearly 4 decades later, 2133.

Be it helping women and girls achieve ambitions, advocating for gender-balanced leadership, respecting differences, or rooting for workplace bias, International Women's Day wants everyone - men and women -to take concrete steps to help achieve gender parity more quickly. 
Women's equality has made positive gains but the world is still unequal.

International Women's Day celebrates the social, political and economic achievements of women while focusing world attention on areas requiring further action."

In many countries, International Women's Day is an occasion to honor and praise women for their accomplishments.

Join International Women’s Day on Facebook at facebook/internationalwomensday and for breaking news follow #womensday.

International Women's Day is an annual day observed in many nations around the world on March 8 each year. (Jumping Woman photo above by kongsky / freedigitalphotos.net)


President Barack Obama proclaimed March 2011 to be "Women's History Month", calling Americans to mark IWD by reflecting on "the extraordinary accomplishments of women" in shaping the country's history.


Also, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton launched the "100 Women Initiative: Empowering Women and Girls through International Exchanges", on the eve of IWD.


Photo above left taken by U.S.Army Photographer: Spc Tobey White, is of U.S. Army Lt. Col. Pam Moody, 319th ADT, and resident of Indianapolis, Ind. Here she hands out pencils to Afghan women at the International Women's Day gathering held in Khowst City, Khowst Province, Afghanistan, March 8, 2011.

Every year events take place on March 8th to commemorate the anniversary of International Women's Day. In 2011, IWD's 100th anniversary, 100 countries participated in events.
Kudos to all women for all we do!

EXPLORE and submit your IWD event or web posting at the International Women's Day activity page. And enjoy learning about what others are doing to celebrate IWD 2017.

Visit INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY 2017 NEWS for more information.

Do you have a theme of your own to celebrate International Women's Day? IF so, share it on the International Women's Day website.

Resources for Women’s History Month: 
http://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/data-mine/2015/03/08/international-womens-day-inequality-in-charts
Make your #PledgeForParity sponsor
http://womenshistorymonth.gov/
http://www.nwhp.org/whm/index.php
 http://www.nwhp.org/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women's_History_Month
http://www.infoplease.com/womens-history-month/
http://www.history.com/topics/womens-history-month
 http://www.gale.cengage.com/free_resources/whm/

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Happy Valentines Day America! What's in your heart this Valentine's Day?

This is a repost from earlier Valentines Day posts.

“To-morrow is Saint Valentine's day,
All in the morning betime,
And I a maid at your window,
To be your Valentine.
Then up he rose, and donn'd his clothes,
And dupp'd the chamber-door;
Let in the maid, that out a maid
Never departed more.” 

~~ William Shakespeare, Hamlet,
Act IV, Scene 5 
Valentine's Day
as ruefully mentioned by Ophelia in Hamlet (1600–1601


Saint Valentine's Day, commonly known as Valentine's Day, or the Feast of Saint Valentine, is observed on February 14 each year. It is celebrated in many countries around the world, although it remains a working day in most countries.

The first recorded association of Valentine's Day with romantic love was in Parliament of Foules (1382) by Geoffrey Chaucer.

Chaucer wrote: 

"For this was on seynt Volantynys day
Whan euery bryd comyth there to chese his make."
 ["For this was on Saint Valentine's Day, when every bird cometh there to choose his mate."]


This poem by Chaucer was written to honor the first anniversary of the engagement of King Richard II of England to Anne of Bohemia. A treaty providing for a marriage was signed on May 2, 1381. (When they were married eight months later, they were each only 15 years old).Have you marked your calendars for giving back this month? February is the month of love and of "giving back," be it supporting a cause or simply going the extra mile for someone. The energi PR firm in Canada is dedicating Valentine's Day to "Acts of Love & Kindness" and closing the office on Friday, February 14th to continue it's strong message of corporate social responsibility.

ACTS of LOVE & KINDNESS performed by energi PR on Friday, February 14, 2014 can be followed online on Facebook and Twitter using the hashtag #energiPRALK.

ALK (Acts of Love & Kindness) was conceived in 1994 by Patrice Tanaka, chief counselor and creative strategist at PadillaCRT and was later adopted by more than 50 public relations firms in the US through the Public Relations Society of America. energi PR approached Tanaka and sought her blessing to bring ALK up to Canada as part of its corporate social responsibility program.






The most popular martyrology associated with Saint Valentine was that he was imprisoned for performing weddings for soldiers who were forbidden to marry and for ministering to Christians, who were persecuted under the Roman Empire; during his imprisonment, he is said to have healed the daughter of his jailer Asterius.

Legend states that before his execution he wrote "from your Valentine" as a farewell to her.

Today, Saint Valentine's Day is an official feast day in the Anglican Communion, as well as in the Lutheran Church.

The Eastern Orthodox Church also celebrates Saint Valentine's Day, however on July 6th in honor of Roman presbyter Saint Valentine, and July 30th, in honor of Hieromartyr Valentine, the Bishop of Interamna.

Numerous early Christian martyrs were named Valentine. The Valentines honored on February 14 are Valentine of Rome (Valentinus presb. m. Romae) and Valentine of Terni (Valentinus ep. Interamnensis m. Romae). Valentine of Rome was a priest in Rome who was martyred about AD 269 and was buried on the Via Flaminia. The flower crowned skull.

The modern cliché Valentine's Day poem can be found in the collection of English nursery rhymes Gammer Gurton's Garland (1784):
The rose is red, the violet's blue,
The honey's sweet, and so are you.
Thou art my love and I am thine;
I drew thee to my Valentine:
The lot was cast and then I drew,
And Fortune said it shou'd be you.



According to the U.S. Greeting Card Association approximately 190 million valentines are sent each year in the US. Half of those valentines are given to family members other than husband or wife, usually to children. When you include the valentine-exchange cards made in school activities the figure goes up to 1 billion, and teachers become the people receiving the most valentines. Also, many send Valentines Day chocolates and other candies.

New traditions have evolved with the internet. Millions of people today use digital (e.g., eCards, eCoupons, etc.) to send Valentine's Day greeting messages. An estimated 15 million e-valentines were sent in 2010. Below are two sets of Valentines Day card collages, to view detail, zoom in 150% to 200%.



Do you plan on volunteering this month and on Valentines Day? Are you participating in any social responsibility initiatives for the month of February? Please share in the comments section and do include links to any of your Valentines Day giving back themed campaigns.

Other Resources 
♦ Closed for the day: Gone volunteering, NewsWire.ca http://www.newswire.ca/en/story/1296689/closed-for-the-day-gone-volunteering
♦ 10 things for happier living: do things for others, actionforhappiness.org, http://www.actionforhappiness.org/10-keys-to-happier-living/do-things-for-others?gclid=CO-V0fuup7wCFZDm7AodiXoAQQ
♦ Becoming Ginger Rogers, How Ballroom Dancing Made Me a Happier Woman, Better Partner, and Smarter CEO, Patrice Tanaka http://www.prsa.org/Conferences/HealthAcademy/Archives/2012/Sessions/2012BecomingGingerRogers#.UusLS_ldV7M
♦ Valentines Day Ecards http://www.americangreetings.com/ecards/valentines-day?source=aggoogle548
♦ Greeting Card Association http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greeting_Card_Association
♦ No better place to say "I Love You" than Times Square, TimesSquare.org http://www.timessquarenyc.org/events/valentines-day/index.aspx
♦ Guy Kawasaki Google Plus, https://plus.google.com/+GuyKawasaki/posts/8SaRPXr8cEA#+GuyKawasaki/posts/8SaRPXr8cEA
♦ Valentines Day Recipes & Cooking, FoodNetwork http://www.foodnetwork.com/valentines-day/package/index.html



All photos courtesy of Wikimedia and screen shots taken from video and websites. All other photos will be credited as required.



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